I was invited into the HPE Influencer group through its development of an IoT group. I wrote a couple of times about the Texmark refinery in Houston that was a cool IoT application. The IoT thing cooled there like everywhere–morphing into “edge-to-cloud” technology and architecture. However, here is a new blog post regarding IoT and Zero-Trust security from HPE and writer David Rand.

LESSONS FOR LEADERS 

  • There are fewer zero trust approaches for IoT than desktops, but you can still make a strong zero trust defense.
  • As on other platforms, zero trust for IoT means IT must do extra work and take extra care. That’s just the world we live in.
  • Enterprise IoT devices are a juicy target for attackers looking for a toehold in your network.

And here, from the blog:

Last March, a 21-year-old Swiss hacker successfully accessed and seized control of 150,000 smart industrial cameras developed by Verkada, a little known security-as-a-service company in Silicon Valley.

As hackers often do, the antagonist, still on the run from authorities, attacked security cameras in hospitals, factories, police departments, prisons, gyms, schools, and offices just to prove he could. In doing so, he also demonstrated how hard it has become to fully trust the cyberdefenses of those millions of internet of things (IoT) devices attaching to corporate networks around the world.

“Organizations are slowly waking up to the reality that their IT environments are not limited to the data center, office, or laptops their employees use to work from home,” says Craig Robinson, program director for worldwide security services at IDC. “IoT devices are increasingly on corporate networks, and traditional IT cybersecurity methods alone aren’t up to the task of ensuring they do not turn into major vulnerabilities.”

I’m receiving more news regarding cybersecurity than any other topic presently. Obviously hackers have noticed the pervasive networking throughout industrial and manufacturing plants and can’t avoid the temptation to see what they can do. Especially given Russian attacks on Ukrainian power plants in the current war. We all need to tap into as many ideas as feasible.

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