Podcast 180–Ask Why For Learning and Growing Business

Podcast 180–Ask Why For Learning and Growing Business

I have unleashed another podcast–180 Asking Why.

Asking why? Continuous learning. Helping educate our children. Ideas for solving new problems and developing new business.

Not in the podcast, but in the realm of learning, change agents, asking why, I have been reading Beth Comstock’s book, Imagine It Forward: Courage, Creativity, and the Power of Change reflecting on her experiences at GE and NBC. Must read for all of you who are change agents.

Rockwell Automation Launches Executive Podcast Series

Rockwell Automation Launches Executive Podcast Series

More and more companies are going direct with their marketing communication activities and social media. It’s been a trend for a while and gaining momentum. They are doing their own webcasts, email marketing, newsletters, and even magazines. Rockwell Automation is expanding the offering by launching a podcast series. I have not listened to one, yet, just having received this notice. Give it a try if you work in the IoT or manufacturing software area.

Rockwell Automation is launching an executive podcast series, “State of the Industry: Your Guide to the Future of Smart Manufacturing.” The podcast is available on iTunes.

The show is hosted by David Vasko, director of Advanced Technology, Rockwell Automation, who is responsible for the company’s technology roadmap and leads their global research and development.

Vasko discusses a range of topics with business and academia thought leaders – from how industrial technologies, such as blockchain, will transform supply chains to how academic and business partnerships address workforce and upskilling challenges.

The latest episode features a discussion with Robert D. Atkinson, president of the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF). They explore how robotics, machine learning and artificial intelligence will affect the next-gen workforce.

In another episode, Vasko and Mark Mone, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Chancellor, discuss industry-academia collaborations and how those partnerships integrate real-world industrial experience and higher education. In a separate episode, Vasko and Tim Biernat, a principal software architect in the Rockwell Automation Advanced Technology Lab, discuss the potential of using blockchain in industrial supply chains.

Go to iTunes, Overcast (my favorite), or at Rockwell.

Podcast 179 Humans and Technology in Manufacturing

Podcast 179 Humans and Technology in Manufacturing

Once upon a time, people made useful things in the shop under their apartment or in the shed out back.

The product of their labor was very much a piece of themselves. A little bit of their soul went into their creation.

This was a podcast originally scripted for Labor Day, but it morphed into a discussion of labor, automation, and how automation is / can be an assistant to humans.

Here’s a shout out to my sponsors: Ignition from Inductive Automation and Manufacturing Day. 

By 2025, the Manufacturing Institute and Deloitte project that manufacturers must fill 3.5 million skilled jobs. The workforce skills gap is very real.

On October 5th, Manufacturing Day, thousands of manufacturers will do something about this by opening their doors to those interested in manufacturing careers.

Give students and educators in your area a chance to discover modern manufacturing.

 

Podcast 178 What Problem Are You Solving

Podcast 178 What Problem Are You Solving

Podcast 178 What Problem Are You Solving

It has been said that computers are great at generating questions. They just can’t figure out the right question. Engineers are problem solvers. That is 99% of their education. Thing is—are they solving the right problem?

Businesses have adopted the open office architecture for many years. It solves a business cost problem—get more people per square foot. They publicly justify it, though, as solving the people collaboration problem. But they create a people productivity problem. The signal v noise blog from BaseCamp called Library Rules
[https://m.signalvnoise.com/library-rules-how-to-make-an-open-office-plan-work-f9f6d69a2d4c] proposes an interesting solution. The open office has existed for centuries. And it works fantastically. It’s called a library. Check out library rules for your open office dilemma.

My grandkids naturally collaborate on iPads with Minecraft.

Solving technology problems is a lot of fun for engineers. They look at everything as a technology problem. But then there are problems that are not technology. Such as people problems. Take a look at Facebook’s problems right now. They are not technology; they are ethical.

A generation of engineers have worked hard at solving process control problems. I reflect on a chat I had with Schneider Electric process automation leaders Gary Freburger and Peter Martin about solving business problems in addition to technology problems.

 

 

George Raveling On Reading, Life

George Raveling On Reading, Life

What you fill your mind with is what you become. You can spend your life listening to bubble gum for the brain or stuff designed to stir up your emotions–or, you can fill your mind with positive thoughts and material designed to teach and expand you.

I listen to podcasts. At least an hour a day. I just finished one that is a must-listen. (Of course, other than mine 🙂

This is the podcast of Tim Ferriss (4-hour Work Week, Tools of the Titans, etc.). He just interviewed George Raveling in the most fascinating conversation I’ve heard in years.

Learn about his reading habits and how he takes notes. He gifted Ferriss with a number of books including one of my favorites–Eric Hoffer’s The True Believer-Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements. I read it in the mid-60s and the ideas have formed much of my outlook. He wrote it in 1951, but it is just as relevant today.

Raveling was the first black basketball head coach in the PAC 8 (later PAC 10) at Washington State and then the first black head basketball coach in the Big 10 while at Iowa. Later he coached at USC. He became Global Director of Sports Marketing at Nike and was instrumental in signing Michael Jordan and beginning the Air Jordan dynasty.

He was born in Washington, D.C. and essentially orphaned at age 13. He tells the story of getting into a Catholic school, his many mentors, and how he wound up on the podium during Martin Luther King’s “I have a dream” speech.

For your own personal growth and development, you need to listen to this.

A couple of quotes:

“I’ve always had this theory that, if you help enough people get what they want, you’ll always get what you want.”

“If it has to be, it’s up to me.”

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